mediapipe_model_maker.face_stylizer.face_stylizer.loss_functions.VGGPerceptualLoss

Perceptual loss based on VGG19 pretrained on the ImageNet dataset.

Inherits From: PerceptualLoss

Reference:

Perceptual loss measures high-level perceptual and semantic differences between images.

loss_weight Loss weight coefficients.

activity_regularizer Optional regularizer function for the output of this layer.
autotune_steps_per_execution Settable property to enable tuning for steps_per_execution
compute_dtype The dtype of the layer's computations.

This is equivalent to Layer.dtype_policy.compute_dtype. Unless mixed precision is used, this is the same as Layer.dtype, the dtype of the weights.

Layers automatically cast their inputs to the compute dtype, which causes computations and the output to be in the compute dtype as well. This is done by the base Layer class in Layer.call, so you do not have to insert these casts if implementing your own layer.

Layers often perform certain internal computations in higher precision when compute_dtype is float16 or bfloat16 for numeric stability. The output will still typically be float16 or bfloat16 in such cases.

distribute_reduction_method The method employed to reduce per-replica values during training.

Unless specified, the value "auto" will be assumed, indicating that the reduction strategy should be chosen based on the current running environment. See reduce_per_replica function for more details.

distribute_strategy The tf.distribute.Strategy this model was created under.
dtype The dtype of the layer weights.

This is equivalent to Layer.dtype_policy.variable_dtype. Unless mixed precision is used, this is the same as Layer.compute_dtype, the dtype of the layer's computations.

dtype_policy The dtype policy associated with this layer.

This is an instance of a tf.keras.mixed_precision.Policy.

dynamic Whether the layer is dynamic (eager-only); set in the constructor.
input Retrieves the input tensor(s) of a layer.

Only applicable if the layer has exactly one input, i.e. if it is connected to one incoming layer.

input_spec InputSpec instance(s) describing the input format for this layer.

When you create a layer subclass, you can set self.input_spec to enable the layer to run input compatibility checks when it is called. Consider a Conv2D layer: it can only be called on a single input tensor of rank 4. As such, you can set, in __init__():

self.input_spec = tf.keras.layers.InputSpec(ndim=4)

Now, if you try to call the layer on an input that isn't rank 4 (for instance, an input of shape (2,), it will raise a nicely-formatted error:

ValueError: Input 0 of layer conv2d is incompatible with the layer:
expected ndim=4, found ndim=1. Full shape received: [2]

Input checks that can be specified via input_spec include:

  • Structure (e.g. a single input, a list of 2 inputs, etc)
  • Shape
  • Rank (ndim)
  • Dtype

For more information, see tf.keras.layers.InputSpec.

jit_compile Specify whether to compile the model with XLA.

XLA is an optimizing compiler for machine learning. jit_compile is not enabled by default. Note that jit_compile=True may not necessarily work for all models.

For more information on supported operations please refer to the XLA documentation. Also refer to known XLA issues for more details.

layers

losses List of losses added using the add_loss() API.

Variable regularization tensors are created when this property is accessed, so it is eager safe: accessing losses under a tf.GradientTape will propagate gradients back to the corresponding variables.

class MyLayer(tf.keras.layers.Layer):
  def call(self, inputs):
    self.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(inputs)))
    return inputs
l = MyLayer()
l(np.ones((10, 1)))
l.losses
[1.0]
inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
x = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Activity regularization.
len(model.losses)
0
model.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(x)))
len(model.losses)
1
inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10, kernel_initializer='ones')
x = d(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Weight regularization.
model.add_loss(lambda: tf.reduce_mean(d.kernel))
model.losses
[<tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=float32, numpy=1.0>]

metrics Return metrics added using compile() or add_metric().

inputs = tf.keras.layers.Input(shape=(3,))
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(2)(inputs)
model = tf.keras.models.Model(inputs=inputs, outputs=outputs)
model.compile(optimizer="Adam", loss="mse", metrics=["mae"])
[m.name for m in model.metrics]
[]
x = np.random.random((2, 3))
y = np.random.randint(0, 2, (2, 2))
model.fit(x, y)
[m.name for m in model.metrics]
['loss', 'mae']
inputs = tf.keras.layers.Input(shape=(3,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(2, name='out')
output_1 = d(inputs)
output_2 = d(inputs)
model = tf.keras.models.Model(
   inputs=inputs, outputs=[output_1, output_2])
model.add_metric(
   tf.reduce_sum(output_2), name='mean', aggregation='mean')
model.compile(optimizer="Adam", loss="mse", metrics=["mae", "acc"])
model.fit(x, (y, y))
[m.name for m in model.metrics]
['loss', 'out_loss', 'out_1_loss', 'out_mae', 'out_acc', 'out_1_mae',
'out_1_acc', 'mean']

metrics_names Returns the model's display labels for all outputs.

inputs = tf.keras.layers.Input(shape=(3,))
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(2)(inputs)
model = tf.keras.models.Model(inputs=inputs, outputs=outputs)
model.compile(optimizer="Adam", loss="mse", metrics=["mae"])
model.metrics_names
[]
x = np.random.random((2, 3))
y = np.random.randint(0, 2, (2, 2))
model.fit(x, y)
model.metrics_names
['loss', 'mae']
inputs = tf.keras.layers.Input(shape=(3,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(2, name='out')
output_1 = d(inputs)
output_2 = d(inputs)
model = tf.keras.models.Model(
   inputs=inputs, outputs=[output_1, output_2])
model.compile(optimizer="Adam", loss="mse", metrics=["mae", "acc"])
model.fit(x, (y, y))
model.metrics_names
['loss', 'out_loss', 'out_1_loss', 'out_mae', 'out_acc', 'out_1_mae',
'out_1_acc']

name Name of the layer (string), set in the constructor.
name_scope Returns a tf.name_scope instance for this class.
non_trainable_weights List of all non-trainable weights tracked by this layer.

Non-trainable weights are not updated during training. They are expected to be updated manually in call().

output Retrieves the output tensor(s) of a layer.

Only applicable if the layer has exactly one output, i.e. if it is connected to one incoming layer.

run_eagerly Settable attribute indicating whether the model should run eagerly.

Running eagerly means that your model will be run step by step, like Python code. Your model might run slower, but it should become easier for you to debug it by stepping into individual layer calls.

By default, we will attempt to compile your model to a static graph to deliver the best execution performance.

steps_per_execution Settable steps_per_execution variable. Requires a compiled model. </td> </tr><tr> <td>submodules` Sequence of all sub-modules.

Submodules are modules which are properties of this module, or found as properties of modules which are properties of this module (and so on).

a = tf.Module()
b = tf.Module()
c = tf.Module()
a.b = b
b.c = c
list(a.submodules) == [b, c]
True
list(b.submodules) == [c]
True
list(c.submodules) == []
True

supports_masking Whether this layer supports computing a mask using compute_mask.
trainable

trainable_weights List of all trainable weights tracked by this layer.

Trainable weights are updated via gradient descent during training.

variable_dtype Alias of Layer.dtype, the dtype of the weights.
weights Returns the list of all layer variables/weights.

Methods

add_loss

Add loss tensor(s), potentially dependent on layer inputs.

Some losses (for instance, activity regularization losses) may be dependent on the inputs passed when calling a layer. Hence, when reusing the same layer on different inputs a and b, some entries in layer.losses may be dependent on a and some on b. This method automatically keeps track of dependencies.

This method can be used inside a subclassed layer or model's call function, in which case losses should be a Tensor or list of Tensors.

Example:

class MyLayer(tf.keras.layers.Layer):
  def call(self, inputs):
    self.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(inputs)))
    return inputs

The same code works in distributed training: the input to add_loss() is treated like a regularization loss and averaged across replicas by the training loop (both built-in Model.fit() and compliant custom training loops).

The add_loss method can also be called directly on a Functional Model during construction. In this case, any loss Tensors passed to this Model must be symbolic and be able to be traced back to the model's Inputs. These losses become part of the model's topology and are tracked in get_config.